No Space for Letters of Commitment?

The grant application guidelines allow 15 pages of attachments, with ten consumed by required documents (IRS determination letter, board list, etc.). You’ve got 15 letters of commitment from diverse community groups pledging resources, volunteers, facilities, transportation, and other significant benefits. It’s a conundrum! The letters are powerful. Which do you use? Which do you leave out?

Win Grants with Proven Partnerships

One organization can’t do everything, and go-it-alone grant proposals that don’t make good use of community networks and resources are not convincing. The most effective proposals include authentic collaborations where participating organizations pursue their own missions while also contributing to a common goal. Unless the "usual-suspect" groups are involved as partners, funders will have questions. For example, if an early childhood agency wants to improve child health through better nutrition, it only makes sense to work with the food bank and the community health center.

When Grantmakers Investigate: Are You Ready for Your Close-Up?

A written proposal is usually just the first step in the grantmaking process. The proposal is not the only information private foundations or corporate grantmakers will use to learn about your organization and to make funding decisions.These private funders may refer to a variety of sources when investigating your organization. Keep the following in mind when you submit a proposal.