Proposal Writing and Grantseeking

What's a Social Entrepreneur?

Since reading a 2010 paper by Howard Husock published by the Philanthropy Roundtable, I’ve had this question on my mind. Ruth McCambridge of the Nonprofit Quarterly raised it again not too long ago in a LinkedIn group (Readers of the Nonprofit Quarterly), and I was compelled to peck out a quick reply on my iPhone while waiting for a 6 am flight home from McAllen, TX, where I’d been teaching (yes, there were typos).

 

Junk Money?

Junk Money

In the field of fund development, grants aren’t all that well respected. Once, after I was well known for bringing in millions of grant dollars, a local fund development director recognized me as “the woman who raises all the junk money.” Junk money?

 

Fund development professionals focus on individual giving because it’s the largest piece of the philanthropic pie. Individual giving represented about 73% of all giving in 2011, and 81% if you throw in bequests–the dollars total about $242.20 billion. Fund development professionals also focus here because the dollars are generally flexible, renewable, and growable. Individual giving done right can be the beanstalk to the golden eggs that just keep coming. I get that.

 

Evolution

                                                                                                                                                                              

Our vision for this blog is simple—to present the best thinking in the field of grant developmentwhat we call grantsmanship.

 

First I want to establish The Grantsmanship Center’s footing because, historically, we’ve got a lot to live up to. Norton Kiritz established The Grantsmanship Center because he was deeply concerned that nonprofits making valuable social contributions had trouble getting grants. Norton began teaching proposal writing when no one else was doing it. In 1972, he founded The Grantsmanship Center because it needed to be done and no one else was leading the way.

 

What is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit?

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What is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit?

501(c)(3) nonprofits are charitable organizations that operate in the public interest and have been granted tax-exempt status from the federal government. 501(c)(3)s do not pay federal income tax and people who contribute to these organizations can often receive deductions on their federal income tax.

If you’re interested in starting a nonprofit organization, check out the National Council on Foundations how-to advice.

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Who is eligible to receive grants?

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Who is eligible to receive grants?

There are many types of grant seekers–private nonprofit organizations, educational institutions, public nonprofits such as municipalities, Native American tribes, and even individuals and for-profit businesses. Eligibility to receive funds under a specific grant program, or to receive funds from a specific funder, vary widely. Different grant programs and funders have varying requirements for eligibility.

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Who makes grants?

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Who makes grants?

There are many types of grantmakers–federal, state, county, and municipal governments; corporations; private foundations; public charities; trusts; religious institutions, etc. Each grant maker has its own specific interests and requirements.

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Jabberwocky Junkies

CLASSIC ARTICLE - Why are RFPs, grant proposals, and other forms of communication among philanthropic organizations littered with jargon? Tony Proscio takes a wry look at our addiction to buzzwords, dissects a few trendy examples, and suggests some ways to kick the habit.

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